Rollover Car Accidents | Pensacola Personal Injury Attorneys
Whibbs & Stone, Attorneys at Law

Three Leading Causes of Rollover Accidents

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Rollover accidents may not happen often, but they do play a big role in the number of fatalities on US roads. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), rollover accidents are one of the deadliest forms of car accident. Rollover crashes constitute about 3% of all motor vehicle accidents each year, per the NHTSA, but cause approximately 30% of all roadway fatalities. Rollover accidents are extremely violent for those involved, and can result in serious trauma to survivors. Read on to learn about the three most common reasons that rollovers occur.

Roadway “trips” causing a rollover

“Trips” are a term used to describe defects or dangerous elements in or along the road that can pull a vehicle’s tires sharply to one side, causing the vehicle to roll. Potholes, curbs, guardrails, and soft shoulders (shoulders that aren’t paved) can all serve as trips, especially if the vehicle is traveling at a high rate of speed.

Defective vehicle or tire design

While all vehicles are capable of rolling over, certain vehicles are more likely than others to roll in a crash. Vehicles which are elevated and have high centers of gravity on a narrow wheel base are more prone to roll over than lower or wider vehicles. Certain models of SUV, truck, and large van are some examples of rollover-prone vehicles. Additionally, tires that have too much grip can contribute to the occurrence of a rollover. Tires that adhere too closely to the road will allow lateral forces to build up more than a tire that has slightly less grip, and these forces can pull the vehicle to one side more aggressively and cause it to roll.

Sharply jerking the wheel to one side

Rollovers happen when vehicles turn or shift to one side too quickly, causing the center of gravity to shift to that side of the vehicle. Jerking the steering wheel with too much force can cause this effect. Drivers will be more likely to need to jerk the steering wheel to avoid hitting another car or object where they are distracted and notice the hazard too late, or if they’re driving too fast and allowing insufficient space between themselves and the car in front of them.

If you or someone you love has been hurt in a rollover accident in Florida or Alabama and need help in recovering the money damages you’re owed by the at-fault driver, contact the knowledgeable, experienced, and effective personal injury lawyers at Whibbs Stone Barnett for a consultation on your case at 888-219-4561, with Florida offices conveniently located in Pensacola and Ft. Walton Beach, and an additional office in Fairhope, Alabama.